What Courses Can I Expect as a Biblical Studies Major?

If you are considering going for a biblical studies major, you may naturally be wondering about the courses that you will subsequently take. You can already deduce a high concentration on the Christian Bible and related concepts, but what exactly are some of the courses for this major all about? To help bring some clarity to the subject, here are some examples of the real-life courses you will likely be expected to take.

Intro to Biblical Studies

Intro to Biblical Studies is a sort of introductory or orientation course that will likely be required of you early on. This course sets you up with the basic foundations for what lies ahead in your studies. It also provides a foundational understanding of Christian organization and how the religion is self-grouped and organized by denominations, positions within the church, and more. From here, students are generally much better set for coming learning endeavors.

Christian Heritage

As a biblical studies major, you will also likely encounter at least one course that is all about Christian heritage. This course takes a deep look at heritage and culture in the Christian worlds of yesterday, today, and tomorrow alike. What are some of the highlights of this culture? What are some of its motivating moments? Learn about these concepts here.

Local Church Leadership

Your understanding of the belief sets of Christianity is one goal of your major. Another goal is for you to understand and recognize organizational methods at the local level. Local Church Leadership is a fairly common course encountered by biblical studies majors, and understandably so. Local churches make up the vast majority of practicing facilities and members of this religion.

The Life of Christ

Without an in-depth study of the life of the historic and biblical Jesus Christ, no biblical studies major would be complete. Jesus Christ was the central character to the formation of this religion. His life, actions, and dramatic death by crucifixion formed the basis for what would come after the Bible's Old Testament – the other half of the entire belief system. The Life of Christ course can be expected in virtually all biblical studies majors out there.

Survey of the Old Testament

As alluded to above, the Old Testament could symbolically be seen as one half of the entire religion of Christianity. It is this book, or section of the Bible, that lays out the Ten Commandments as well as the history of God and man before the introduction of Jesus Christ. This particular course will delve into all of this and more.

Survey of the New Testament

The New Testament introduces Jesus Christ and provides us with what we could consider to be the other half of the religion. As quite eloquently stated by Christian author and teacher, Max Lucado, "Though the Bible was written over sixteen centuries by at least forty authors, it has one central theme-salvation through faith in Christ." As a result of the sheer importance of this portion of Christianity, Survey of the New Testament as well as a number of other associated courses will be required for your major.

The biblical studies major is one that will take the learner on an expedition through the vast world of Christianity and its practice through modern times. The above-mentioned courses are just a few examples of the many that will be required of the student along the way. For additional information on the exact courses you can expect as a biblical studies major, you will need to inquire directly with the specific institutions with which you have interest in studying.

Related resource: