Forensic Careers

  • Forensic Anthropologist
  • Forensic Archaeologist
  • Forensic Pathologist
  • Forensic Microscopist
  • Crime Scene Technician

For those who seek them, there is certainly no shortage of fascinating and often quite thrilling careers in the field of forensics. Forensics is a broad investigational term, and it covers many sub-sciences and off-shooting studies. So, without further adieu, let's take a look at some of these most exciting of jobs to be found here.

Forensic Anthropologist

Perhaps most representative of the forensics field as a whole in popular culture today is the vocation of the forensic anthropologist. Per the American Board of Forensic Anthropologists, "Forensic anthropology is the application of the science of physical or biological anthropology to the legal process. Physical or biological anthropologists who specialize in forensics primarily focus their studies on the human skeleton". It is these professionals, therefore, who study bones and human remains so as to assist in law enforcement-based forensic investigations.

Forensic Archaeologist

Forensic archaeologists function in a similar capacity to the above-mentioned forensic anthropologist. In the field, office, or lab, these individuals apply forensic investigative techniques to human remains and other associated evidence. Although these are highly related disciples, the forensic archeologist differs from the forensic anthropologist in that the archaeologist is more often brought in to work on materials that are thought to be quite old. Any area or materials of interest from several centuries old to as little as several decades may become subject to the forensic archaeologist's directives.

Forensic Pathologist

Pathology is the science that is all about understanding disease and microbiological matter with specific regard to potential effects on the human body. Therefore, a forensic pathologist is the expert that is utilized in determining such pathology-based facts regarding a particular crime or suspicious death. In death cases, postmortem examination is utilized by this professional to collect samples and evidence, ultimately painting a picture of the facts of the case. Each state handles these types of forensic pathology duties differently, but the goal of credible fact-finding is always the same.

Forensic Microscopist

In general, a microscopist is someone who specializes in microscope use and many of its applicable sciences. A forensic microscopist takes this specialty vocation to the next level with a specific concern in forensic investigative endeavors. Samples derived from crime scenes, victim's bodies, or even environmental matter of concern are all suspect to the microscopic analysis and specialty training of this professional. For those wanting an up-close and personal experience with case-deciding evidence of all sorts, this profession provides just that.

Crime Scene Technician

Finally, and certainly not least in the line of thrilling forensics vocations, the work of the crime scene technician is quite real and gritty to put matters mildly. It is this technician that arrives on-scene when a suspicious death has occurred and collects, records, and maintains on-scene evidence along with other investigative officers on the scene. This professional will often see some of the most exciting, disturbing, and riveting scenes of any other worker on this list. Boredom here is certainly not included.

If it's a thrill you're after, professional forensics work can definitely provide such a job-seeker just that. There are plenty of fascinating positions to be had in this field, but the aforementioned five are certainly some of the most intense in this area of vocational interest. For more information on the vast world of thrilling careers in the field of forensics, the Consortium of Forensic Science Organizations is linked to a wide array of such resources as well as a variety of applicable, practicing organizations.

Related resource:

Top 5 Cheap Online Forensic Science Degree Programs